Image of a ferry sailing on the ocean with a large ship in the distance

P&O Ferries: what are my redundancy rights?

Last week, 800 members of P&O Ferries staff were told via a pre-recorded video message that they were being made redundant with immediate effect.

It has now come to light that the company’s actions were illegal, as under British law, the firm was required to consult trade unions before making any mass redundancies. Their chief executive has admitted this didn’t happen.

Being made redundant, also known as redundancy, is a form of dismissal from your job that happens when employers need to reduce their workforce. This is often as part of money saving measures.

When an employer makes the decision to make staff redundant, there are several rules and processes that they must follow to make sure that you are being treated fairly.

What are my rights if I’m being made redundant?

There are a range of things that you might be eligible for if you’re being made redundant. These include:

  • redundancy pay
  • a notice period
  • a consultation with your employer
  • the option to move into a different job
  • time off the find a new job

There are also rules and regulations in place to make sure that if you’re selected for redundancy it’s done fairly, and not because you’re being discriminated against.

Our 15 frequently ask questions about redundancy article covers in detail what your rights are and what treatment you should expect from your employer.

What if I’m struggling to deal emotionally with being made redundant?

Losing your job is a significant life event and so it’s no surprise that you might be feeling a wide range of emotions from anger, to anxiety and grief.

Our article on the five stages of redundancy grief explores some of the emotions you might be feeling and gives some tips with dealing with them.

If you feel like you need extra support, don’t be afraid to reach out. Find support for your mental health.

What other support is available?

If you’ve been made redundant and would like further support, call the Work Well Advice Line.

The Work Well Advice Line provides confidential employment advice to anyone who needs it. Our friendly employment advisers will take the time to listen to you and your problem. They will then provide you with information about who you can contact for further support. This could be local NHS services in your area, charities or other organisations.

Call 020 3228 2041 (calls charged at standard rate) or leave your details in our form for a free call back or support by email.